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This Month In USMC History
1 October 1997:
The first African-American female colonel in the Marine Corps was promoted to that rank during a ceremony at MCAS Cherry Point, North Carolina. Colonel Gilda A. Jackson, a native of Columbus, Ohio, made Marine Corps history when she achieved the rank of colonel. She was serving as Special Projects Officer, 2d Marine Aircraft Wing at the time of her promotion.

5 October 1775:
Meeting in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the 2d Continental Congress used the word "Marines" on one of the earliest known occasions, when it directed General George Washington to secure two vessels on "Continental risque and pay", and to give orders for the "proper encouragement to the Marines and seamen" to serve on the two armed ships.

6 October 1945:
Major General Keller E. Rockey, Commanding General, III Amphibious Corps, accepted the surrender of 50,000 Japanese troops in North China on behalf of the Chinese Nationalist government.

8 October 1889:
A force of 375 Marines under command of future Commandant George F. Elliott, attacked and captured the insurgent town of Novaleta, Luzon, Philippine Islands, and linked up with U.S. Army troops. There were 11 Marine casualties.

9 October 1917:
The 8th Marines was activated at Quantico, Virginia. Although the regiment would not see combat in Europe during World War I, the officers and enlisted men of the 8th Marines participated in operations against dissidents in Haiti for over five years during the 1920s. During World War II, the regiment was assigned to the 2d Marine Division and participated in combat operations on Guadalcanal, Tarawa, Saipan, Tinian, and Okinawa, and earned three Presidential Unit Citations.

11 October 1951:
A Marine battalion was flown by transport helicopters to a frontline combat position for the first time, when HMR-161 lifted the 3d Battalion, 7th Marines, and its equipment, during Operation Bumblebee, northeast of Yanggu, Korea.

19 October 1968:
Operation Maui Peak, a combined regimental-sized operation which began on 6 October, ended 11 miles northwest of An Hoa, Vietnam. More than 300 enemy were killed in the 13-day operation.

23 October 1983:
At 0622 an explosive-laden truck slammed into the BLT headquarters building in Beirut, Lebanon, where more than 300 men were billeted. The massive explosion collapsed the building in seconds, and took the lives of 241 Americans--including 220 Marines. This was the highest loss of life in a single day for Marines since D-Day on Iwo Jima in 1945.

28 October 1962:
An 11,000-man 5th Marine Expeditionary Brigade left Camp Pendleton by sea for the Caribbean during the Cuban Missile Crisis. One week earlier, the entire 189,000-man Marine Corps had been put on alert and elements of the 1st and 2d Marine Divisions were sent to Guantanamo Bay to reinforce the defenders of the U.S. Naval Base. Other 2d Division units and squadrons from five Marine Aircraft Groups were deployed at Key West, Florida, or in Caribbean waters during the Cuban crisis.

31 October 1919:
A patrol of Marines and gendarmes, led by Sergeant Herman H. Hanneken, disguised themselves as Cacos and entered the headquarters of the Haitian Caco Leader, Charlemagne Peralte, killing the bandit chief, and dispersing his followers. Sergeant Hanneken and Corporal William R. Button were each awarded the Medal of Honor.

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The 21-Gun Salute


The 21-gun salute honoring the President of the United States, like many American military traditions, appears to be another custom inherited from Great Britain. In early times, it was customary for a ship entering a friendly port to discharge its broadsides to demonstrate that they were unloaded; eventually it became a British practice to fire a seven-gun salute. The forts ashore would fire three shots for each shot fired afloat. The three guns fired on shore to one gun fired on ship had a practical explanation. In earlier days, gunpowder was made of sodium nitrate and was easier to keep on shore than at sea. When gunpowder was improved by the use of potassium nitrate, the sea salute was made equal to the shore salute. The use of numbers "seven" and "three" in early gun salutes probably was connected to the mystical or religious significance surrounding these numbers in many cultures.

Gun salutes continue to be fired in odd numbers, of course, and this is likely because of ancient superstitions that uneven numbers are lucky. As early as 1685, the firing of an even number of guns in salute was taken as indicating that a ship's captain, master, or master gunner had died on a voyage. Indeed, the firing of an even number of salute guns at the coronation of George VI in 1937 was regarded by at least one observer as an "ominous" portent. Incidentally, the normal interval of five seconds in the firing of gun salutes likely is in order for the salute to have full auditory effect, and also to give the salute a more solemn character.

The United States presidential salute has not always been 21 guns. In 1812 and 1821 it was the same as the number of states, i.e. 18 and 24, respectively, which was also our international salute. After 1841 the President received a salute of 21 guns and the Vice President 17; currently the Vice President receives a salute of 19 guns.

There has evolved over the last 175 years or so a prescribed number of guns, set forth in various Army regulations, to be fired for various dignitaries in accordance with the perceived importance of their positions. On 18 August 1875, the United States and Great Britain announced an agreement to return salutes "gun for gun," with the 21-gun salute as the highest national honor.

Today, a 21-gun salute on arrival and departure, with 4 ruffles and flourishes, is rendered to the President of the United States, to an ex-President, and to a President elect. The national anthem or "Hail to the Chief," as appropriate, is played for the President, and the national anthem for the others. A 21-gun salute on arrival and departure with 4 ruffles and flourishes also is rendered to the sovereign or chief of state of a foreign country, or a member of a reigning royal family. In these ceremonies, the national anthem of his or her country also is played.

Incidentally, U.S. Naval Regulations require that a 21-gun salute be fired at noon on Presidents Day, Independence Day, and Memorial Day.




Posted by admin on Friday 21 December 2007 - 01:22:42 | LAN_THEME_20
Marseilles receives plaque honoring Marines


MARSEILLES - Former Marine Glenn Borvansky led the community Saturday in saluting the Freedom Wall, all military veterans, and the Corps 232nd birthday during presentation of the First Marine Division plaque to the city.

In an easy-going, low-keyed ceremony at the site of the Middle East Conflicts Mem-orial Wall, Borvansky presented the $800 bronze plaque to Marseilles Mayor James Trager in honor of the FMD and entire Corps.

The plaque is one of about four of its kind. The others are displayed in locations including Okinawa and Guadalcanal.

"That's quite an honor," said Trager in unveiling the plaque. "I'm here to assure Glenn we will find an honorable site for it in the future."

Trager noted the city will construct a sidewalk along the east side of South Main Street, then under the bridge and west to the Freedom Wall.

"My idea is to put this plaque and any other awards we receive along that riverbank. We will find a place for it," he said in reference to Borvansky's year-long effort to have the city accept the plaque.

"I thank Glenn for all his efforts," Trager added. "He's like a dog with a ball in his conquest to get this plaque placed in Marseilles."

Prior to the presentation, Borvansky said he would like for the plaque to be installed along the sidewalk in the area somewhere east of the Freedom Wall.

"Hopefully it will be where the new sidewalk is to be built," he said. "Hopefully the Walk of Honor will be set up, and give dignity to our memorial honoring the Mideast Conflicts Wall, and without taking away from the men and women who gave their lives for our country."


The plaque was given to the city by the FMD Association in honor of all Marines and veterans of every branch of the military.

During the program, Borvansky touched on the history of the First Marine Division, which traces its roots back to March 8, 1911.

"The oldest, largest, and most decorated division in Marine Corps history," he said.

The First Division sustained the most deaths of any Army or Marine Corps division in the Pacific Theater during World War II, with 3,407 casualties. The division earned three presidential citations during the Korean War, in which it had 4,400 casualties, he said.


During the Vietnam War, the FMD won two more presidential unit citations. From 1965 to 1969, the division lost more than 6,000 members in combat.

"Nearly half of all the Marine fatalities in Vietnam," said Borvansky.

The FMD participated in Operation Desert Shield in 1990, and in Kuwait during the Persian Gulf War of 1999, in which eight Marines were killed.

The division lost two Marines in combat after being deployed to Samolia in Operation Restore Hope in 1992-1993, and then won another presidential citation in Iraq in 2003.

The division was deployed again to Iraq in 2004 and 2006.

"As of May 26, 2007, the First Marine Division has sustained 341 deaths in Iraq.

There are 5,836 names on this wall," he said, pointing to the Mideast Conflicts Memorial. "We are here today to honor them, and to honor the city for being the host to this wall."

The ceremony concluded with Taps and the Marine Corps Hymn. The color guard from veterans posts in Sandwich posted and retrieved the flag.

Larry Allen of Sandwich was among the visitors. He saw the Freedom Wall in 2004, when four panels were in place. Eight panels make up the memorial now.

“Three panels were completely filled with names, and the fourth wasn't more than a third full of names,” he said. “It's sad to see those names up there. Unfortunately, there is room for probably three or four more panels. I hope they don't get used.”

Allen served with the 101st Airborne Division in Vietnam in 1969-1970.

“I was a rifleman in a platoon squad,” he said. “I saw it, yes, ma'am.”

WW II Marine veteran Ernie Upton cut the birthday cake during the reception at the local American Legion/Veterans of Foreign Wars Post.



Posted by admin on Wednesday 19 December 2007 - 21:10:16 | LAN_THEME_20
Marseilles receives plaque honoring Marines


MARSEILLES - Former Marine Glenn Borvansky led the community Saturday in saluting the Freedom Wall, all military veterans, and the Corps 232nd birthday during presentation of the First Marine Division plaque to the city.

In an easy-going, low-keyed ceremony at the site of the Middle East Conflicts Mem-orial Wall, Borvansky presented the $800 bronze plaque to Marseilles Mayor James Trager in honor of the FMD and entire Corps.

The plaque is one of about four of its kind. The others are displayed in locations including Okinawa and Guadalcanal.

"That's quite an honor," said Trager in unveiling the plaque. "I'm here to assure Glenn we will find an honorable site for it in the future."

Trager noted the city will construct a sidewalk along the east side of South Main Street, then under the bridge and west to the Freedom Wall.
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"My idea is to put this plaque and any other awards we receive along that riverbank. We will find a place for it," he said in reference to Borvansky's year-long effort to have the city accept the plaque.

"I thank Glenn for all his efforts," Trager added. "He's like a dog with a ball in his conquest to get this plaque placed in Marseilles."

Prior to the presentation, Borvansky said he would like for the plaque to be installed along the sidewalk in the area somewhere east of the Freedom Wall.

"Hopefully it will be where the new sidewalk is to be built," he said. "Hopefully the Walk of Honor will be set up, and give dignity to our memorial honoring the Mideast Conflicts Wall, and without taking away from the men and women who gave their lives for our country."


The plaque was given to the city by the FMD Association in honor of all Marines and veterans of every branch of the military.

During the program, Borvansky touched on the history of the First Marine Division, which traces its roots back to March 8, 1911.

"The oldest, largest, and most decorated division in Marine Corps history," he said.

The First Division sustained the most deaths of any Army or Marine Corps division in the Pacific Theater during World War II, with 3,407 casualties. The division earned three presidential citations during the Korean War, in which it had 4,400 casualties, he said.


During the Vietnam War, the FMD won two more presidential unit citations. From 1965 to 1969, the division lost more than 6,000 members in combat.

"Nearly half of all the Marine fatalities in Vietnam," said Borvansky.

The FMD participated in Operation Desert Shield in 1990, and in Kuwait during the Persian Gulf War of 1999, in which eight Marines were killed.

The division lost two Marines in combat after being deployed to Samolia in Operation Restore Hope in 1992-1993, and then won another presidential citation in Iraq in 2003.

The division was deployed again to Iraq in 2004 and 2006.

"As of May 26, 2007, the First Marine Division has sustained 341 deaths in Iraq.

There are 5,836 names on this wall," he said, pointing to the Mideast Conflicts Memorial. "We are here today to honor them, and to honor the city for being the host to this wall."

The ceremony concluded with Taps and the Marine Corps Hymn. The color guard from veterans posts in Sandwich posted and retrieved the flag.

Larry Allen of Sandwich was among the visitors. He saw the Freedom Wall in 2004, when four panels were in place. Eight panels make up the memorial now.

“Three panels were completely filled with names, and the fourth wasn't more than a third full of names,” he said. “It's sad to see those names up there. Unfortunately, there is room for probably three or four more panels. I hope they don't get used.”

Allen served with the 101st Airborne Division in Vietnam in 1969-1970.

“I was a rifleman in a platoon squad,” he said. “I saw it, yes, ma'am.”

WW II Marine veteran Ernie Upton cut the birthday cake during the reception at the local American Legion/Veterans of Foreign Wars Post.



Posted by admin on Wednesday 19 December 2007 - 21:09:09 | LAN_THEME_20
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Marine Of The Month


Lance Cpl. James M. Gluff







20, of Tunnel Hill, Ga.; assigned to the 1st Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, II Marine Expeditionary Force, Camp Lejeune, N.C.; died Jan. 19 in Ramadi, Iraq, while conducting combat operations.







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